Articles Posted in Truck Accidents

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The American Trucking Associations have finally put enough pressure on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), compelling it to “make available a study of the links between Compliance Safety Accountability (CSA) violations and crash risk used to develop its methodology for assigning carriers’ CSA scores,” says The Trucker. In a recent statement, FMCSA indicated that it would soon make the Violation Severity Assessment Study Report, which was published in 2007, publicly available through the Compliance, Safety, Accountability program docket found at www.fmcsa.dot.gov. The Associations allege that they have been requesting the results of the study in writing since 2010. The research, the motor carrier publication The Trucker reports, examined the use of police reports to determine accountability when it comes to trucking accidents. The various associations came together in a demand for the study in the hopes that it would allow them to “evaluate CSA and other substantial proposals to improve it.”

For many Atlanta truck accident attorneys the FMCSA’s delay in granting the requests of the Associations comes as a surprise, especially since the agency purports that its primary goal is to strengthen commercial vehicle and driver safety. Created in 2000, the agency was designed to regulate trucking practices in the United States.CSA is a comprehensive program administered by the FMCSA under the authority of the Department of Transportation. The CSA program is meant to improve motor carrier and bus safety by reducing crashes, injuries, and fatalities by providing evaluations of the safety performance of carriers and drivers and identifying behavior patterns that may result in unsafe operations.
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On January 29, 2005, The Windsor Wildcats, a Canadian women’s youth hockey team from Windsor, Ontario, was traveling through New York, on their way to a ski resort for the holidays. As they traveled, it is likely that they never expected that their trip would end in anything but merriment. However, unfortunately for them, their trip ended in tragedy instead. As the team’s bus traveled through Western New York, it collided with a tractor-trailer truck, causing an auto accident that ended in the death of 4 individuals, and the injury to 19.

According to The Washington Post, the bus, which was carrying a women’s hockey team, comprised of young women ranging from 19 to 21 years of age, swerved on Interstate Highway 390, and slammed into a tractor truck that was parked on the side of the highway on Jan. 29, 2005. The trucking accident occurred about 30 miles outside of Rochester, at dusk.

The Washington Post reports that the police initially suspected that driver fatigue and inexperience led to the crash. The 24 year old bus driver, Ryan Comfort had only driven for the bus company for two months. Although the bus driver escaped criminal charges because a grand jury declined to indict him, witnesses said he was driving erratically before the crash. The bus driver pleaded guilty to a logbook violation and a traffic violation of failing to stay in the proper lane and was fined $300.

Four individuals were killed as a result of this tragic collision. Those individual include: Richard Edwards, the coach of the Windsor Wildcats women’s hockey team; his 13-year-old son, Brian; a third passenger, Catherine Roach; and the driver of the tractor trailer truck, Ernest Zeiset Jr. All of the remaining passengers on the bus sustained injuries. Those nineteen individuals suffered injuries which ranged from broken bones to brain trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder.
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Two people were injured earlier in an accident involving a truck that crashed into a railway bridge. The impact of the accident caused a huge block of concrete to fall off from the bridge, and onto the truck as well as another car below. The truck driver and the occupant of another vehicle sustained injuries in the accident.

According to authorities, the accident occurred at about nine in the morning, when the truck was trying to clear the railway bridge. It was a 13-foot high truck with a hydraulic lift, and it was trying to clear the bridge which is just about 13 feet and 5 inches high. The lift struck the bridge, leading to a large chunk of concrete breaking off and collapsing. The heavy 25-foot chunk of concrete fell on the truck, trapping the driver inside. Some more bridge debris fell onto another vehicle that was just behind the truck.

The driver of the truck was trapped inside for more than an hour. It took fire fighters that long to extricate him from the truck. He has suffered injuries to his leg and feet. The driver of the other vehicle that was also struck by the concrete debris has also suffered injuries. None of the injuries are reported to be life-threatening.

Injury attorneys which handle trucking accidents regular deal with truck accidents in which a driver or shipper fails to secure their loads. In this case, the driver of the truck has been charged with failure to obey a traffic control device, and failure to secure loads. The bridge had to be closed down for more than 48 hours while authorities determined whether it was safe for traffic to flow again. However, according to authorities, the damage to the bridge seems to be merely cosmetic, and doesn’t really affect the load-bearing capability of the bridge.

According to Atlanta City Councilwoman Felicia Moore, safety hazards with trucks striking the bridge have been a frequent problem over the past few years. There are several spots on the bridge where you can see damage denoting spots where trucks have collided with the bridge. According to Councilwoman Moore, she will look at finding ways to cut down the volumes of truck traffic underneath the bridge.
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